Should you get tested for coeliac?

From Allergy and Autoimmune Disease for Healthcare Professionals October 9 2019

Apparently 70% of people who have coeliac have yet to be tested for it.

Who may have it?

4.7% of those with irritable bowel syndrome.

20% of those with mouth ulcers.

8% of infertile couples.

16% of type one diabetics.

7.5% of first degree relatives of people with coeliac.

About 50% of people who are diagnosed have iron deficiency diagnosis  at the time of coeliac diagnosis.

Other people who need to be tested may have:

Pancreatic insufficiency

Early onset osteoporosis or osteopenia

vitamin and mineral deficiencies

gall bladder malfunction

secondary lactose intolerance

peripheral and central nervous system disorders

Turner’s syndrome

Down’s syndrome

Dental enamel defects

persistent raised liver enzymes of unknown cause

peripheral neuropathy or ataxia

metabolic bone disorders

autoimmune thyroid disease

unexplained iron, vitamin D or folate deficiency

unexpected weight loss

prolonged fatigue

faltering growth

second degree relative with coeliac disease

My comment: I had years of  the mouth ulcers, iron deficiency anaemia and irritable bowel symptoms which all resolved completely on a wheat free diet. The problem is that if I did want tested I would need to go back on wheat for a minimum of six weeks to give my antibodies a chance to build up sufficiently to test positive.  Thus, best to get a test BEFORE you go on a wheat free diet.

 

 

3 thoughts on “Should you get tested for coeliac?”

  1. I have not heard of coeliac, but those looks a lot like methotrexate mouth sores. So i will tell you what i do for MTX mouth sores. Mary’s Magic Mouthwash. In the US it is a compounded medication. It cures it almost immediately. But be sure the scrip includes a small amount of topical steroid. Perfect. I will now retire my medical license. I got it that license in a cracker jack box.

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  2. An old, dear freind was diagnosed with coeliac disease in his 70s. He found it very hard to adjust his diet, finding food mostly! But he claimed he felt better once he’d removed wheat. My IBS does not like fibrous foods.

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