Dr Ivor Cummings: Interview with Dr William Davis

In the last of our three part exploration of the cardiovascular disease epidemic, Irish doctor Ivor Cummings interviews Dr William Davis consultant cardiologist about what really prevents and reduces coronary artery atheroma. Also discussed is the most effective way to increase your magnesium intake which relaxes smooth muscle thereby reducing blood pressure.

Dr Cummings’s runs his blog  known as the Fat Emperor.

 

https://thefatemperor.com/ep37-william-davis-md-cardiologist-reveals-the-solutions-to-modern-chronic-disease/

There are benefits to that pre-breakfast workout

Adapted from Edinburgh RM et al. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism 21 Oct 2019 

Research suggests that blood sugar levels can be better controlled by planned eating and exercise timings.

This study was conducted in Bath and Birmingham and involved a six week trial of 30 overweight or obese men. They were divided into three groups. One group ate breakfast before exercise, one group after exercise and the third group made no changes to their diet or exercise (or lack of it). Groups one and two swapped over after the first six weeks.

The researchers showed that you doubled the amount of fat burned during exercise if breakfast was delayed. This was mainly because the group had lower insulin levels due to their prolonged overnight fast. They could therefore burn more fat in their fat stores or muscle. The groups did not do more exercise than the pre-workout breakfast group.

Groups one and two swapped over after the first three weeks. The men’s BMI averaged at 30 and was closely matched in each group. Although insulin sensitivity was improved in the longer fasting group, there was not any significant weight loss.

Soldiers improve their physique on a ketogenic diet

Adapted from Military Medicine January 2019 by Richard Al LaFountain et al of Ohio State University.

This is the first study of a ketogenic diet in military personnel. Daily ketone monitoring was done to personalise the diet. 29 subjects from various branches of the military took part over the 12 week study.

15 self selected to go on the ketogenic diet (KD) monitored by blood ketones daily. 14 continued their mixed diet (MD). Various measurements were done at the start and end of the programme.

All of the KD group were in ketosis throughout the 12 weeks as assessed by beta-hydroxybutrate levels. The KD group lost 7.7kg more (range -3.5 to -13.6kg) despite no calorie restriction. They lost 5.1% body fat (range -0.5 to -9.6%). 43.7% was visceral fat (range – 3.0  to – 66.3%) and had a 48% improvement in insulin sensitivity. There were no changes in the MD group.  There were no changes between the groups in aerobic capacity, maximal strength, power and a military specific obstacle course.

The authors conclude that this was a very well accepted intervention which showed remarkable improvements in body composition and weight without compromising physical performance in exercise training.

In the USA two thirds of active military personnel are overweight or obese which mirrors the general population. Nearly three out of four young people aged 17-24 fail to qualify for military service mainly due to obesity and failure to meet fitness standard thus posing an impending recruitment crisis.

The military usually follow the USDA’s dietary guidelines that advocates low fat, high carbohydrate foods. Americans have followed these recommendations for decades and have seen a marked rise in obesity at the same time. A diet that emphasises carbohydrate has the effect on suppressing fat oxidation and the production of ketones. Over half of active military personnel report drinking sugar and caffeine containing energy drinks in the past month.

Ketones produced while following a ketogenic diet have been shown to improve fat oxidation, enhance gene expression, inflammation, antioxidant defense and  healthspan. Fat loss without the explicit need to restrict calories is a benefit. Reversal of metabolic syndrome and obesity occurs. Previous studies have shown no detrimental impact on endurance and resistance training performance. The study was done in the military to see if this was a feasible approach.

The success of a ketogenic diet depends on commitment so we did not randomise the subjects. Both groups took part in identical physical training that emphasised strength and power.

Participants were recruited from the Ohio State Reserve Officer Training Corps and other local groups with a military affiliation.  We wanted people as similar as possible to the demographics of serving soldiers regarding age, sex, race and body mass. Participants were excluded if they had had previous experience of a ketogenic diet, were over 50, had certain illnesses, conditions, medications or allergies or who could not exercise safely.

The KD group were coached and were provided with unlimited frozen, pre-cooked meals and grocery supplies.  Carbohydrate was limited initially to 25g per day and protein to 90 g/d until ketosis occurred. Thereafter they could increase the amounts in their diet provided they stayed in ketosis. They were encouraged to use salt.  Carbohydrate was targeted at less than 50g per day including non starchy vegetables, nuts, seeds, selected fruit and berries. Protein goals were 0.6 – 1.0g g/kg of lean body mass. Total energy intake was not restricted. Non starchy vegetables and fats were encouraged to reach satiety. Alcohol over 2 drinks a day was discouraged in both groups.  Participants checked their blood ketones every morning and sent pictures of their readings to the research team.

The mixed diet group had a minimum consumption of 40% dietary calories from carbohydrate.  All participants met with registered dieticians and were encouraged to eat to satiety with no specific caloric limit. Dietary supplements were not allowed.

All groups undertook a progressive resistance training programme two days a week for an hour at a time. They had one additional cardio training session a week consisting of running and body weight circuit training for at least 30 minutes. Each resistance training session ended with 15 minutes of whole body, high intensity circuit training.

Body mass and body composition was measured by DEXA. Fat was assessed by MRI. Indirect calorimetry was used to evaluate resting metabolic rate and the respiratory exchange ratio.

The most noteworthy result was a spontaneous reduction in energy intake resulting in a uniformly greater weight loss for the ketogenic group.  The visceral fat was also markedly reduced which leads to a reduced risk for insulin resistance and cardiometabolic disease.  Insulin sensitivity improved in the ketogenic group.

Normalisation of weight is important for soldiers because non combat musculoskeletal injury is 33% more common in this group.

Subjects in this study were overweight but not obese, so the weight loss effect could be expected to be even more in obese subjects.  Release of fatty acids and ketones are likely the cause of the satiety effect leading to less hunger. The weight loss in the ketogenic group was 80% from body fat mass.  44% of the fat lost was from the viscera, largely in the middle of the body.

Because the subjects decided what diet they would follow, selection bias can’t be ruled out. The KD  group was also slightly heavier at baseline than the MD group.  The two women in the KD group responded similarly to the men.

 

 

 

 

Diabetic complications that affect your tendons and skin

BMJ 1 Dec 18 Diabetic Dermopathy

Shin spots occur in 17-40% of people with type one and two diabetes. The spots can also be seen in the forearms. They tend to be irregularly shaped, brown and they don’t itch or bleed.

The older you are and the longer you have had diabetes, the more you are likely to have. They are thought to be due to small blood vessel changes similar to the kind that cause other complications like retinopathy and neuropathy.

Comment: Do any of you have them? I haven’t even noticed them before but I will keep an eye out for them now.

British Journal of General Practice December 18

Adapted from Tendinopathy in type 2 diabetes by Richard Baskerville et al

People with diabetes have three times the risk of all musculoskeletal conditions and particularly tendon problems. Tendon problems are also more resistant to treatment in diabetics.

Half of people with type two diabetes who are given exercise programmes for a variety of health conditions drop out due to musculoskeletal symptoms. Tendon problems can be for example, Achilles tendinopathy, rotator cuff problems in the shoulder, tennis elbow and trigger finger.

In a typical GP practice 18% of diabetic patients will be affected for around three months for each episode over a five year period.

Tendonitis means that the person has an acute condition with inflammation of the tendon. Tendinopathy is a degenerative process that lasts weeks or months.

Tendinopathy is due to too much wear and not enough repair of the tendons. Diabetics also have the added problem of sugar molecules binding onto collagen. Instead of the collagen fibres running over each other like silk sheets, they get stuck together like Velcro. Blood supply, collagen production and healing are impaired. Obesity, high blood pressure, ageing, alcohol and smoking are all independent factors that worsen tendon healing.

Tendinopathy is more likely in people who are on insulin or who have had the condition more than five years. Other conditions which are related such as bursitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, Dupuytren’s contracture, frozen shoulder and plantar fasciitis are also more common in diabetes.

The onset of tendinopathy tends to be gradual but a trivial event can bring it to light. The symptoms are of unusual pain and stiffness on certain activities. If the condition is not better by two months it is usually due to a tendinopathy.

The tendon is painful when pressed or moved. The area does not have increased warmth. There is often reduced muscle strength. Tendonitis on the other hand is usually an acute condition with redness, warmth and a crackling feeling under the examining finger.

Early physiotherapy is the mainstay of treatment. The aim is to improve general fitness, stretch the muscles and load the muscles in a controlled way. Recovery is often painful and slow.

Acute tendonitis can be managed with non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs and gels. Renal, gut, cardiac disease and hypertension can limit treatment. Steroid injections can help in the short term.

Tendinopathy is often recurrent. It is best to keep HbA1c and blood glucose variability low. If an episode has not settled  in six weeks physio is recommended.

 

 

 

Sheri Colberg: Debunking some physical activity and training myths

Adapted from Sheri Colberg’s article in Diabetes in Control July 6 2019

Exercise does NOT make you more tired.

Most people feel more invigorated after a workout. Regular exercise helps you cope better physically and mentally with your work and personal life.  During periods of acute stress, at work for instance, a short brisk walk can help clear your mind and bump up your energy levels.  Exercise helps reduce insomnia too.

You do NOT have to work out in a “fat burning range” to lose weight.

Just exercise as long and intensely as is reasonable for you if you want to lose weight.  You do use up a little more fat at lower intensity exercise but this mainly happens during the recovery phase.

Your muscles will NOT turn into fat if you stop weight training.

Keep your muscles strong and noticeable by physical activity and exercise and aim to avoid fat gain.

Weight training will NOT bulk you up if you are a woman.

It takes a great deal of effort for men to bulk up doing weight training and this effort is magnified in women because they have very little testosterone. Your total weight may increase if you weight train as muscle is heavier than fat. Pay attention to how you look and feel and how your clothes fit rather than have a fixed idea of the optimum number on a scale.

No pain does NOT mean no gain.

You need to distinguish the feeling of lactic acid in the muscle from a well executed exercise set and delayed muscle soreness a day or two afterward with acute muscle tears and overtraining. The time it takes to recover is a good guide. Also adjust your timing and intensity gradually.

Lifting weights slowly does NOT necessarily mean you will build more muscle.

Lifting slowly can increase the total time that your muscle is under tension. This can increase muscle endurance. Lifting the heaviest weight quickly helps you recruit more muscle fibres and will result in bigger muscles. So if you are lifting a weight slowly during a particular exercise but could lift it faster, to build muscle you either need to move that weight faster or use a heavier weight.

Working on your abdominal muscles WON’T give you a flat belly.

You can’t spot reduce. You can tone up your belly and back muscles but what really helps is getting rid of excess fat covering the muscle. You can do harder workouts to increase your muscle mass and this will help you burn more calories including at rest.

More exercise does NOT mean more fitness

Overuse injuries are more common if you are working out for more than 60-90 minutes of aerobic exercise a day. Cross fit and high intensity interval training are likely to be more beneficial than very long workouts.

You DO NOT have to eat huge amounts of protein.

If you do weight train you do need more protein but only up to twice that for a sedentary person. That is 1.6 to 1.7 grams of protein per kilogram body weight. Most people, especially those on a low carb diet will naturally be eating enough protein. Some protein after exercise may be beneficial especially whey protein. You can eat natural foods eg egg whites or drink chocolate milk (careful about sugar) instead.

You DO NOT need to sweat profusely to do good.

Sweating varies a lot between men and women and individuals. If you are physically trained you may sweat sooner and more. The exercise intensity will affect it. So does the ambient temperature and humidity. Sometimes not sweating enough can be a sign of dehydration so it doesn’t always reflect your effort.

Sheri’s book The Athlete’s Guide to Diabetes: Expert advice for 165 Sports and Activities is available on Amazon and at Barnes and Noble stores.

She has websites to help you:Sheri Colberg.com and DiabetesMotion.com

 

 

 

BeTravelFit: Ultimate travel workout

From: BeTravelFit blog:
While I was traveling I saw myself faced with situations in which I didn’t have access to any sort of gym, not even a bar to do Pull-Ups with, hell, not even a damn park bench to do Tricep-Dips on because every single bench in the park was used by loved up couples and other people who don’t work out because they actually do have a social life and other things do to then lifting (what a bunch of losers).
So here’s a workout that you can perform anytime, anywhere, with absolutely no equipment needed – just as promised.
The workout consists of three different circuits with three different exercises in each circuit. The exercises in each circuit are to be performed directly one after another with no rest in between. That way the heart-rate stays elevated over an extended period of time and more calories are burned as a result.

Circuit 1: Upper Body (Chest, Shoulders and Triceps) – To be performed 5 times, 60 secs rest
Hindu Push* up x 5
Diamond Push-Up x 5
Push-Up x amrap (as many repetitions as possible)
Circuit 2: Lower Body (Quads, Glutes, Hamstrings and Calves) – To be performed 5 times, 30 secs rest
Single Leg Box Squat x 10
Single Leg Romanian Deadlift x 10
Single Leg Calf-Raise x 15
Circuit 3: Core (Abs And Lower Back) – To be performed 5 times, 30 secs rest
Oblique Crunch x 10
Crunch x 20
Plank for 60 secs
And there you go, here’s your first full body, zero equipment, bodyweight only workout!
It burns a ton of calories, engages all major muscle groups and keeps you occupied for at least an hour to an hour and a half. Feel free to add extra repetitions or sets to make the workout more challenging as you progress and don’t feel intimidated if you can’t perform as many repetitions as suggested in the routine. Just give it your best shot and you’ll be fine!

 

  • Assume the downward dog position. Move your upper body backwards,  into child’s pose, and then move your head and trunk forwards taking your weight in your arms till you then extend your head up with your trunk in the upward dog position.

Matthew’s Friends: a lifeline for epileptic patients

The charity Matthew’s Friends was set up by Emma Williams whose son Matthew got a great improvement in his epilepsy which did not respond to drugs but did respond to a ketogenic diet.

The charity aims to promote the ketogenic dietary option as an adjunct or alterative to drugs in children or adults whose epilepsy control is sub optimal. The hassle of following the diet often becomes much more preferable to facing a daily struggle with unpredictable and dangerous fits.

The website, Matthew’s Friends#KetoKitchen You Tube channel gives free ketogenic recipes, demonstrations and tutorials, which can be a great help to those embarking on ketogenic or low carb diets, including many diabetics. 

Professor Helen Cross from Great Ormond Street Hospital writes: Epilepsy affects 1% of all children, and in 25% of cases  there are continued fits despite considerable effort with medication. This can affect physical and mental ability, learning and behaviour. This not only affects the child but their family. The ketogenic diet has been used for almost one hundred years to treat epilepsy. There are different versions of the diet. The long chain triglyceride diet, the more liberal medium chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins and Low Glycaemic index diet. The best diet for an individual will be developed with the help of qualified and trained ketogenic dieticians in conjunction with the family. Such help is essential. In 60% of people who are resistant to anti-epileptic drugs, they respond, at least  to some extent to a ketogenic diet.

A three month trial of the ketogenic diet is advised to see if there is a response or not.In many cases, the response is so marked that medication can be stopped entirely. Obviously, direct clinical supervision is mandatory.

Matthew’s Friends can advise parents or people who would like to improve their epilepsy and provide contacts and materials to get started on an appropriate ketogenic diet. They are always grateful for donations to further their work.