BeTravelFit: Ultimate travel workout

From: BeTravelFit blog:
While I was traveling I saw myself faced with situations in which I didn’t have access to any sort of gym, not even a bar to do Pull-Ups with, hell, not even a damn park bench to do Tricep-Dips on because every single bench in the park was used by loved up couples and other people who don’t work out because they actually do have a social life and other things do to then lifting (what a bunch of losers).
So here’s a workout that you can perform anytime, anywhere, with absolutely no equipment needed – just as promised.
The workout consists of three different circuits with three different exercises in each circuit. The exercises in each circuit are to be performed directly one after another with no rest in between. That way the heart-rate stays elevated over an extended period of time and more calories are burned as a result.

Circuit 1: Upper Body (Chest, Shoulders and Triceps) – To be performed 5 times, 60 secs rest
Hindu Push* up x 5
Diamond Push-Up x 5
Push-Up x amrap (as many repetitions as possible)
Circuit 2: Lower Body (Quads, Glutes, Hamstrings and Calves) – To be performed 5 times, 30 secs rest
Single Leg Box Squat x 10
Single Leg Romanian Deadlift x 10
Single Leg Calf-Raise x 15
Circuit 3: Core (Abs And Lower Back) – To be performed 5 times, 30 secs rest
Oblique Crunch x 10
Crunch x 20
Plank for 60 secs
And there you go, here’s your first full body, zero equipment, bodyweight only workout!
It burns a ton of calories, engages all major muscle groups and keeps you occupied for at least an hour to an hour and a half. Feel free to add extra repetitions or sets to make the workout more challenging as you progress and don’t feel intimidated if you can’t perform as many repetitions as suggested in the routine. Just give it your best shot and you’ll be fine!

 

  • Assume the downward dog position. Move your upper body backwards,  into child’s pose, and then move your head and trunk forwards taking your weight in your arms till you then extend your head up with your trunk in the upward dog position.

Matthew’s Friends: a lifeline for epileptic patients

The charity Matthew’s Friends was set up by Emma Williams whose son Matthew got a great improvement in his epilepsy which did not respond to drugs but did respond to a ketogenic diet.

The charity aims to promote the ketogenic dietary option as an adjunct or alterative to drugs in children or adults whose epilepsy control is sub optimal. The hassle of following the diet often becomes much more preferable to facing a daily struggle with unpredictable and dangerous fits.

The website, Matthew’s Friends#KetoKitchen You Tube channel gives free ketogenic recipes, demonstrations and tutorials, which can be a great help to those embarking on ketogenic or low carb diets, including many diabetics. 

Professor Helen Cross from Great Ormond Street Hospital writes: Epilepsy affects 1% of all children, and in 25% of cases  there are continued fits despite considerable effort with medication. This can affect physical and mental ability, learning and behaviour. This not only affects the child but their family. The ketogenic diet has been used for almost one hundred years to treat epilepsy. There are different versions of the diet. The long chain triglyceride diet, the more liberal medium chain triglyceride diet, the modified Atkins and Low Glycaemic index diet. The best diet for an individual will be developed with the help of qualified and trained ketogenic dieticians in conjunction with the family. Such help is essential. In 60% of people who are resistant to anti-epileptic drugs, they respond, at least  to some extent to a ketogenic diet.

A three month trial of the ketogenic diet is advised to see if there is a response or not.In many cases, the response is so marked that medication can be stopped entirely. Obviously, direct clinical supervision is mandatory.

Matthew’s Friends can advise parents or people who would like to improve their epilepsy and provide contacts and materials to get started on an appropriate ketogenic diet. They are always grateful for donations to further their work.

When do you stop getting benefits from exercise?

From Danielle Baron’s article in International Medical News 10 August 18

As with many different health interventions, there is a sweet spot between doing enough of it and doing too much of it. Too little, and it is not effective. Too much and you could cause unexpected negative repercussions.  The subject of exercise has been investigated regarding its effect on mental health.

Over 1.2 million USA citizens were asked about their exercise habits and their mental wellbeing between 2011 and 2015 by researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

All exercise types improved mental health but popular team sports were particularly effective in boosting mental health. The optimal duration of exercise was between 30 and 60 minutes a session, three to five times a week.

Sessions of longer than 90 minutes or done more than 23 times a month however, were related to WORSE mental health.

The authors conclude that blanket advice on exercise could be improved by being more specific about the types, durations and frequencies that were more likely to improve mental health and that further studies could be helpful.

Chekroud SR et al. Association between physical exercise and mental health in 1.2 million individuals in the USA between 2011 and 2015: a cross sectional study. Lancet Psychiatry. Published online 8 August 2018. doi: 10.1016/S2215-0366(18)30227-X

My comments: Oh dear! Well, I’ve got the duration right at 40 minutes but I hate team sports (because I’m useless at hand to eye or foot coordination) and I aim to exercise every day, which these researchers considered “excessive”.  Maybe the team sports were more beneficial because of the socialisation aspect as well as the physical aspect. Maybe less than 23 times a month made it something to look forward to and a dopamine hit , “I’ve achieved that” rather than a black mark ” I failed to do my exercise session”   as I tend to think about it. I can see the downsides of exercise addiction reflected in this piece of research. 

The Athletes Guide to Diabetes

There’s a new book out for everyone who has questions to ask about how you exercise with diabetes, and it includes advice about low-carb eating and exercise.

Nearly 300 athletic individuals were included in this new edition, now re-titled The Athlete’s Guide to Diabetes by Shelley Colberg, after answering Shelley’s online survey about their activities and diabetes management. And 15 athletes are included in all-new profiles.

Much of the first half of the book has been rewritten to include low-carb eating, the latest diabetes technologies, new medications, and much more. Tips and best practices to deal with device slippage, temperature extremes, and different activities are included as well.

There is guidance and unique perspectives on 165 sports and activities. More than 80% of the content is entirely new, and the publisher is offering an online CE exam for anyone who needs the credits.

Check it out on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and Human Kinetics.

Amazon (in USA–but other countries to follow shortly):

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NMZ1P7Z/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=drshercolbaut-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=B07NMZ1P7Z&linkId=256f1452429dce96118c121dfba945aa

Barnes & Noble:

https://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/books/1129666399?ean=9781492588733#/

Human Kinetics (publisher site):

https://us.humankinetics.com/search?type=product&q=colberg

Your pulse is an indicator how long you will live as well as your fitness

A study published in Heart reports that your resting pulse generally indicates how fit you are. It also modestly predicts mortality rates from the obvious cardiovascular disease but just as strongly with such things as breast, colorectal and lung cancers. A difference of 10 beats per minute equates to a 10-20% difference in mortality.

Also reported in Neurology, Swedish women had their baseline fitness tested in 1968 by ergometry while cycling. There neuropsychiatric status was checked at intervals since.  Women in the highest fitness group delayed in onset of dementia by 9.5 years compared to the low fitness group and by 5 years in the medium fitness group.

Keep it up Emma, all that running about is doing you good. Meanwhile I’m sitting here typing with my resting pulse at 56. Maybe I don’t need to?

From articles originally published in Minerva BMJ 28 April 18 and 7 July 18

 

 

Public Health Collaboration Conference 2018: Achieving your optimal blood sugar target

Videos of the lectures given at the Public Health Collaboration conference 2018 which was held in May over the royal wedding weekend have now been released on You Tube.

You can see my talk, Achieving your optimal blood sugar target, as well as others, on the link below. There are a wide variety of lifestyle topics discussed. Happy viewing.

 

https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=public+health+collaboration+conference+2018

Exercise games can aid weight loss in overweight children

USA researchers have proven that video games such as Kinect Sports and Just Dance can help overweight children lose weight and improve their cardiovascular risk factors.

Adherence to the programme of one hour three times a week was very high with 94.4 % sticking to the games. 46 families were involved with 23 families in the intervention and control groups.

BMI , blood pressure, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol all improved in the intervention group.

The study was funded by the AHA.