Susan Pierce Thompson: How to be happy, thin and free

the-3-huge-mistakes-report

This March, Susan’s first book, Bright Line Eating: The Science of Living Happy, Thin & Free, arrived in bookstores.

Here’s what she had to say:

Susan, in Bright Line Eating, you argue that the reason so many people struggle with their weight is that the human brain blocks weight loss. How so?

The human brain was designed to keep us stable in a right-sized body. But modern processed foods and the modern pace of life have hijacked various systems in the brain, and the result is that now, in the present-day environment, the brain does indeed block weight loss.

Here’s how: willpower is a finite resource in the brain. And it doesn’t just help us resist temptations or persevere in the face of challenges – it helps us do all kinds of things, like make decisions (e.g., checking email, going shopping), regulate our emotions (e.g., having kids, being in traffic), and regulate our task performance (e.g., working in Excel, giving a presentation).

After a brief period of time doing any of these things, if we start to think it might be a good time to get something to eat, we’re likely to fall into the Willpower Gap.

This is why so many of us order out for pizza or take-out on a Friday night after a long week, irrespective of how sincere we were when we pledged that this time we would stick with our diet until we lost all our excess weight.

In our modern society, the Willpower Gap is waiting for us, nearly always. Most plans of eating implicitly ask you to rely on your willpower to stick with the plan over the long term. The truth about your brain is that that will never work. You need a plan of eating that assumes you have no willpower at all (because, at any given moment, you may not), and works anyway.

To avoid relying on willpower, you suggest people adopt 4 “bright lines” into their eating habits. What are they?

Bright lines are clear, unambiguous boundaries that you don’t cross, no matter what–similar to how a smoker who wants to quit and get healthy throws up a bright line for cigarettes. The four bright lines I recommend are:

  1. No added sugar or artificial sweeteners
  2. No flour of any kind
  3. Eating only at meals–no snacking or grazing
  4. Bounding quantities of food, both to make sure you get enough vegetables, and to make sure you don’t eat too much of everything else.

What’s one thing everyone reading this can do right now to improve their chances of maintaining a healthy weight?

To really bridge the Willpower Gap, start writing down what you’re going to eat for the day in a little journal, ideally right after dinner the night before. Do it religiously until it becomes a habit. The next day, your job is to eat only and exactly that, no matter what. Make sure there’s no sugar or flour in your food plan for the day, and, ideally, stick with three meals a day, because three meals are much more automatizable than five or six.

Within a few weeks these habits will be automatic, and eating the right things, and not the wrong things, will start to be as easy as brushing your teeth.

 

(From original interview by Ron Friedman)

Planning a pregnancy: the importance of getting slim before you get started

newborn baby

In Europe the World Health Organisation estimate that more than 50% of men and women are overweight or obese and 23% of women are obese.

In a pregnant woman obesity raises her chances of gestational diabetes and pre-eclampsia. She is also more likely to get metabolic syndrome and type two diabetes later in life. The resulting children are more likely to come to harm in utero and at birth and also more likely to become fat children. They are then more likely to develop higher blood pressure and excess weight in early adulthood.

Despite the push to improve the outcome for the babies in utero, lifestyle changes and medical interventions have largely proved unsuccessful.

Women with a BMI over 25 find it more difficult to conceive in the first place and then are more likely to miscarry compared to their slimmer sisters. The miscarriage rate is 1.67. Congenital abnormalities become more common.

The placenta responds to maternal insulin levels. In normal weight women they become 40-50% less sensitive to insulin but this bounces back within days of delivery. Obese women show greater decreases in insulin sensitivity, this affects lipid and amino acid metabolism. African Americans and Southern Asians get these changes at lower body masses than Europeans.

Obese women are more likely to go into labour early. They also may need to be delivered early. They have a higher rate of failed trial of labour, caesarean sections and endometritis and have five times the risk of neonatal injury.

Anaesthetic complications are more common. The Royal College of Obstetrics and Gynaecology recommend that women with a BMI over 40 see an obstetric anaesthetist before going into labour. Epidural failure is more common. The woman may have lower blood pressure and respiratory problems and the baby may have more heart rate decelerations in labour.

Broad spectrum antibiotics are recommended for all caesarean sections. Despite this, overweight women get more post- operative infections. The wounds are also more likely to come apart.

Obese pregnant women are obviously at even more risk.

Babies of obese mothers are usually fatter at birth compared to other babies. Obese mums tend to put on more weight than average during the pregnancy and then find it even harder to lose weight after delivery.

Recent randomised controlled trial  have shown that interventions started after pregnancy have little or no effect. These include increasing the mum’s physical activity and cutting the dietary glycaemic load. These things reduced the weight gained in pregnancy a little but did not affect adverse pregnancy outcomes and the birth of fat babies. Thus there is now a bigger push to intervene before pregnancy.  

Currently between ten and twenty percent of obese women lose weight between pregnancies. This has been found to reduce weight gain in the next pregnancy and also the risk of pre-eclampsia.  Supervised intensive lifestyle interventions can be done, work and are safe, even in breast feeding mothers. Pre-pregnancy classes to get women fit for pregnancy would help improve the outcome for the babies of the future.  The metabolic environment, a mixture of inflammation, insulin resistance, lipotoxicity, and hyperinsulinemia,  can then be optimised prior to conception. After this, it is really too late.

 

Adapted from Obesity and Pregnancy. Patrick M Catalano and Kartik Shankar from Cleveland Ohio and Little Rock Arkansas Universities.  BMJ 18 February 2017 BMJ 2017;356;j1

What being frail means

Miss Havisham

Getting older and frailer is something that we are all going to experience unless we die of something else. We are liable to lose weight, particularly muscle mass, tire very easily, have muscle weakness and be unable to perform our usual activities, and we will walk, if at all, much more slowly.

Along with the obvious external signs, our hearts, kidneys, immune system and bones will weaken. We are more likely to become diabetic, get dementia and other neurological disorders, break bones and get cancer. Our senses dull too, with poor vision, hearing and balance problems. Our appetites dull and we will eat less.

In the USA, a quarter of over 65s are considered frail. Other disease processes could be going on as well as simply getting more frail with age.  Poverty, lonliness, poor diet, polypharmacy and cognitive decline make the situation worse.

More than 70% of frail people have two or more chronic diseases. The commonest are hypertension and osteoarthritis. Insulin resistance leads to type two diabetes. The combination makes falls and fractures more likely than people with simple frailty.

Cardiac failure, anaemia, osteoporosis occur. Parkinson’s disease, Alziehmer’s, Vascular Dementia and Depression are several times more common in the frail population. Cancers, infections and a poorer response to vaccination occur.

Drug reactions are more of a problem in this group of people. They have accumulated more diseases and symptoms and thus more drugs, but they also have a lower body mass and poorer kidney and liver function so that drugs accumulate more easily in the system.  Some drugs cause confusion, instability and falls. A study in a geriatric day hospital showed that on average a person was on 15 different medications and that you can expect about nine of these to have the potential for some problem.

Diogenes and Havisham syndrome refers to a situation where an elderly person lives in socially isolated and filthy conditions. They continue to neglect themselves and are resistant to change. This is more common in those suffering from dementia.

Pressure ulcers may occur unless nursing care is of a very high standard.  Elder abuse can sometimes occur when demands on carers exceed what they can provide.

Although a major sign of frailty is weight loss, you can get a condition called sarcopenic obesity. The person still has too much body fat, but the muscle mass is very low. This population is increasing in numbers as the obesity epidemic continues.

The more frail a person is, the less well they come through surgery successfully.

Hypothermia is more likely in frail people, particularly older age groups, women, more chronic disease eg diabetes, social isolation and those who have sustained a hip fracture.

So, not too much to look forward too! I hope this information will help those of you who care for elderly relatives. When we are looking after ourselves, it is important to keep our muscle mass up to reduce sarcopenia and the difficulty mobilising that is a cardinal sign of the problem of normal aging.

 

Adapted from Frailty Syndrome- Medico legal considerations. Roger W. Byard, University of Adelaide, Australia. Printed in Forensic and Legal Medicine. Volume 30 Pages 34-38. Elselvier.

Weight loss increases hunger: a major obstacle for maintenance

weight-lossWe  know about the issue of slowed metabolism after weight loss due to the lean muscle mass loss that goes along with fat loss. This is one reason why higher protein/low carb diets work better than low fat diets; because muscle mass is maintained better. Well, new information from Diabetes in Control backs up what some of us know intuitively or may have experienced personally….

Losing Weight Increases Hunger

The study showed that for every kg of weight they lost, patients consumed an extra 100 calories a day — more than three times what they would need to maintain the lower weight.

This out-of-proportion increase in appetite when patients lost a small amount of weight may explain why maintaining long-term reduced body weight is so difficult.

A validated mathematical method was used to calculate energy intake changes during a 52-week placebo-controlled trial in 153 patients treated with canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter inhibitor that increases urinary glucose excretion, thereby resulting in weight loss without patients being directly aware of the energy deficit. The relationship between the body weight time course and the calculated energy intake changes was analyzed using principles from engineering control theory.

Previous studies show that metabolism slows when patients lose weight; however, these results suggest that proportional increases in appetite likely play an even more important role in weight plateaus and weight regain.

Knowing that patients with type 2 diabetes who receive the sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT-2) inhibitor canagliflozin (Invokana) as part of a glucose-lowering strategy excrete a fixed amount of glucose in the urine (which causes weight loss), they used a mathematical model to calculate energy-intake changes during a 52-week placebo-controlled trial of the drug, in which 153 patients received 300-mg/day canagliflozin and 89 patients received placebo.  Using this approach meant that the participants who received canagliflozin consistently excreted 90-g/day glucose but were not aware of the energy deficit.

Previously, the researchers had validated a mathematical model to calculate the expected changes in caloric intake corresponding to changes in body weight (Am J Clin Nutr. 2015;102:353-358). They input the current study data into this model.

At study end, the patients who had received placebo had lost less than 1 kg and those who had received canagliflozin had lost about 4 kg. The weight loss with canagliflozin was less than predicted, due to the patients’ increased appetite. On average, patients who received canagliflozin ate about 100 kcal/day more per kg of weight lost — an amount more than threefold larger than the corresponding energy-expenditure adaptations.

“Our results provide the first quantification of the energy-intake feedback-control system in free-living humans,” the researchers write.

They add that in the absence of “ongoing efforts to restrain food intake following weight loss, feedback control of energy intake will result in eating above baseline levels with an accompanying acceleration of weight regain.”

The findings suggest that “a relatively modest increased appetite might explain a lot of the difficulty that people are having in both losing the weight and maintaining that weight loss over time. From the results it was concluded that, while energy expenditure adaptations have often been considered the main reason for slowing of weight loss and subsequent regain, feedback control of energy intake plays an even larger role and helps explain why long-term maintenance of a reduced body weight is so difficult.

The findings suggest that an increased appetite is an even stronger driver of weight regain than slowed metabolism. “The message to clinicians is to not only push physical activity as a way to counter weight regain but also use medications that impact appetite.”

In summary, the researchers conclude the few individuals who successfully maintain weight loss over the long term do so by heroic and vigilant efforts to maintain behavior changes in the face of increased appetite along with persistent suppression of energy expenditure in an omnipresent obesogenic environment. Permanently subverting or countering this feedback control system poses a major challenge for the development of effective obesity therapies.

Practice Pearls:

  • Findings suggest that an increased appetite is an even stronger driver of weight regain than slowed metabolism.
  • Appetite increased by ∼100 kcal/day above baseline per kilogram of lost weight.
  • The message to clinicians is to not only push physical activity as a way to counter weight regain, but also use medications that impact appetite.

Obesity. 2016;24:2289-2295. Abstract

Weight plateaus are a normal, but frustrating, feature of your weight loss journey

frustration

 Here are some words of wisdom and encouragement from a health care professional who knows how discouraging weight loss plateaus can be. Don’t let weight stabilisation lead you to jack in your efforts.
When Losing Weight, Warn ‘em!

Diabetes in Control November 8th 2016

I work in obesity medicine. As many of us know, losing weight isn’t the problem for most, but weight regain is.

As the saying goes for many, you can’t be rich enough or thin enough. Many of our patients come in with unrealistic goals regarding their weight loss, and don’t give themselves enough credit for the weight they have lost. Many, for many reasons, regain.
Woman, 58 years of age, class II obesity, prediabetes (A1C 6.0%), HO depression, on antidepressants, weight of 188, BMI 38. Started on metformin and lower carb meal plan.
Warned her early on it’s not just about losing weight, but what’s important is keeping it off. We need plans for both.
Her treatment plan does not end when she loses weight.  Over 6 months she lost 22 pounds. This is a 12% weight loss. BMI 33.5 now.  No further weight loss since the 6-month period, but no weight gain.
Patient frustrated. She has upped her exercise. No longer wants to continue metformin. Encouraged her to continue her meal plan, metformin and bump up her exercise plan. Praised her for her weight loss and not regaining.  And, reminded her this is what we discussed from the start. She remembered and said she’ll stay with the plan.
Lessons Learned:
  • Keeping weight off is a different stage of the weight loss journey.
  • Reminder that losing 3-5% total body weight can improve health outcomes.
  • 5-7% weight loss was shown in the DPP to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.
  • From the beginning, let patients know there are stages to losing weight. First is to lose, then it’s to keep off the weight lost. Make a plan for both.
  • Regarding weight loss, put more emphasis on the food side.
  • Regarding weight maintenance, put more emphasis on exercise.
  • Remind patient of discussion and encourage patient to embrace the weight loss they have been able to achieve and keep off.

Anonymous

Margaret Coles: Invite this Physiotherapist into your home

At  www.movingtherapy.co.uk. you can find Margaret Cole’s free educational resource to help your health and well being.

home-physio

Margaret worked as a community physiotherapist and when she retired she decided to put her knowledge and experience to good use. She produced videos covering a lot of different situations that you can face regarding your physical and mental states and has put them on the site. She also gives advice on how to lose weight.   People from all over the world have visited the site since 2011.

NHSinform Scotland and her local authority also promote the site.

 

 

Gloomy news if you are overweight

diabetes in cats
He’s a pudgy pussy – but may have a better chance than humans of getting slim again

Obese Have Low Chance of Recovering Normal Body Weight

From Diabetes in Control July 17th 2016

The chance of an obese person attaining normal body weight is 1 in 210 for men and 1 in 124 for women, increasing to 1 in 1,290 for men and 1 in 677 for women with severe obesity, according to a study of UK health records led by King’s College London. The findings suggest that current weight management programmes focused on dieting and exercise are not effective in tackling obesity at population level.

The research, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), tracked the weight of 278,982 participants (129,194 men and 149,788) women using electronic health records from 2004 to 2014. The study looked at the probability of obese patients attaining normal weight or a 5% reduction in body weight; patients who received bariatric surgery were excluded from the study. A minimum of three body mass index (BMI) records per patient was used to estimate weight changes.

The annual chance of obese patients achieving five per cent weight loss was 1 in 12 for men and 1 in 10 for women. For those people who achieved five per cent weight loss, 53 per cent regained this weight within two years and 78 percent had regained the weight within five years.

Overall, only 1,283 men and 2,245 women with a BMI of 30-35 reached their normal body weight, equivalent to an annual probability of 1 in 210 for men and 1 in 124 for women; for those with a BMI above 40, the odds increased to 1 in 1,290 for men and 1 in 677 for women with severe obesity.

Weight cycling, with both increases and decreases in body weight, was also observed in more than a third of patients. The study concludes that current obesity treatments are failing to achieve sustained weight loss for the majority of obese patients.

Dr. Alison Fildes, first author from the Division of Health and Social Care Research at King’s College London (and now based at UCL), said: ‘Losing 5 to 10 per cent of your body weight has been shown to have meaningful health benefits and is often recommended as a weight loss target. These findings highlight how difficult it is for people with obesity to achieve and maintain even small amounts of weight loss.’

“The main treatment options offered to obese patients in the UK are weight management programmes accessed via their GP. This evidence suggests the current system is not working for the vast majority of obese patients.” “Once an adult becomes obese, it is very unlikely that they will return to a healthy body weight. New approaches are urgently needed to deal with this issue. Obesity treatments should focus on preventing overweight and obese patients gaining further weight, while also helping those that do lose weight to keep it off. More importantly, priority needs to be placed on preventing weight gain in the first place.”

Professor Martin Gulliford, senior author from the Division of Health and Social Care Research at King’s College London, said: “Current strategies to tackle obesity, which mainly focus on cutting calories and boosting physical activity, are failing to help the majority of obese patients to shed weight and maintain that weight loss. The greatest opportunity for stemming the current obesity epidemic is in wider-reaching public health policies to prevent obesity in the population.”

Kings College London News Release
Alison Fildes. American Journal of Public Health. Published online ahead of print July 16, 2015: e1–e6. doi:10.2105/AJPH.2015.302773