Fit to serve: Mexican hot chocolate cookies

Best Low Carb Mexican Hot Chocolate Cookies
by fittoservegroup

chilli

Hola amigos! Today, I thought I would share my Low Carb Mexican Hot Chocolate Cookies. If you enjoy chocolate and spices you’re going to love this cookie. I had been toying with the idea of a low carb cookie that reminds us of Mexican hot chocolate. If you are not familiar with Mexican hot chocolate, the addition of cinnamon and cayenne pepper give a regular hot chocolate a major taste boost.
The funny thing is that here in Miami the weather is starting to get warmer and frankly hot chocolate is not on most of our minds. However, we can still enjoy this flavor profile in a delicious low carb keto friendly cookie. What’s neat about adding cinnamon and cayenne pepper to this cookie is that these two spices are known to raise your metabolism. If that’s not a reason to enjoy this cookie, I don’t know what is.
This recipe will produce a very rich chocolate cookie and you can add less spices or leave them out completely if you are not a fan of spicy foods.

Low Carb Mexican Hot Chocolate Cookies
INGREDIENTS
8 ounces of unsweetened chocolate baking squares
4 ounces of sugar free chocolate chips (1/2 cup) (I use Lily’s Stevia sweetened)
½ cup of butter (1 stick)
4 eggs whole eggs
1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
2 teaspoon baking powder
¼ sea salt
2 teaspoons of cinnamon powder
¼ teaspoon of ground cayenne pepper
¼ teaspoon of black pepper
1 1/4 cup of almond flour finely milled
2 cup sugar substitute (I use Swerve)
INSTRUCTIONS
1. Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees and line your cookie sheet with parchment paper or lightly grease your pan.
2. Melt the 8 ounces unsweetened chocolate baking squares and 4 ounces (1/2 cup) of sugar-free chocolate chips with the ½ cup of butter until fully melted and combined on low heat in a double boiler.
3. In a separate bowl mix the almond flour, baking powder, sea salt, and spices and set aside.
4. Now to the cooled chocolate and butter mixture add the 4 eggs, vanilla, sugar substitute and mix well.
5. To this batter add the dry ingredients in the separate bowl and stir until just combined.
6. Fold into the batter the 3/4 cup of sugar-free chocolate chips until combined.
7. Place spoonfuls of the chilled dough on the parchment lined cookie sheets and bake for about 10 minutes. Note: Don’t over bake this cookie to make sure it has the right consistency of chewy inside and crispy outside.
Recipe makes 2 dozen cookies

Jovina: Salsa with a kick

green chillies.jpg

Homemade Salsa

Ingredients

One 26 oz container Pomi chopped tomatoes
1/4 cup finely chopped red onion
2 tablespoons chopped pickled jalapenos
1 garlic clove, minced
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon agave
1/4 teaspoon coriander
1/2 teaspoon chili powder
1/4 teaspoon cumin
1 teaspoon lime juice
A few dashes chipotle Tabasco sauce

Directions

Mix together and chill.

Which medicines work most effectively for diabetic neuropathy?

What treatments can improve pain and quality of life?

This comprehensive report was first published in April 2017 by Diabetes in Control and discusses what old and new medicines work for diabetic neuropathy and importantly which ones don’t.

Pharmaceutical Products and Drugs
Diabetic neuropathy is a nerve disorder that the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney disease estimates affects about 60 to 70% of diabetic patients in some form, with the highest rates of neuropathy occurring in patients who have had diabetes for over 25 years.

Although diabetic neuropathy can affect almost any organ in the body, the most common type of diabetic neuropathy is peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy, which is often worse at night, results in tingling, numbness, and pain occurring in the hands, arms, fingers, legs, feet, and toes.

The best way to prevent diabetic neuropathy is keeping glucose under control and maintaining a healthy weight, but for those who experience this painful condition, finding the best relief can often be difficult and confusing.
Building upon a previously published study from 2014, a new systemic review was conducted to “systemically assess the effect of pharmacological treatments of diabetic peripheral neuropathy (DPN) on pain and quality of life” plus a search of PubMed and Cochrane Database of systemic reviews (reviews from 2011 – March 2016).
A total of 106 randomized controlled trials were used in the final systemic review, including trials analyzed by the previously published study. Only two medications, duloxetine and venlafaxine, had a moderate strength of evidence (SOE) compared to the low strength of evidence found with the remaining 12 study medications. As a class, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs) was found to be an effective treatment for diabetic neuropathy with the most commonly reported adverse effects of dizziness, nausea, and somnolence. Venlafaxine and tricyclic antidepressants were also determine to be effective at relieving pain compared to placebo using the previous analysis’ data.

Pregabalin was determined to be effective at reducing pain compared to placebo but found to have a low SOE due to the inclusion of four unpublished studies causing potential bias. Pregabalin, as well as the other anticonvulsants included, had adverse effects of dizziness, nausea, and somnolence.

Oxcarbazepine was also found to be an effective neuropathy pain reliever compared to placebo.
Atypical opioids have a dual mechanism of action, norepinephrine reuptake inhibition and mu antagonism, which aids in a class wide effective pain relief compared to placebo, and more specifically tramadol and tapentadol were found to be effective vs placebo. The most common adverse effects reported for opioids were constipation, somnolence, and nausea.

The last medication that was determined to be an effective pain reliever of diabetic neuropathy compared to placebo was botulinum toxin

Gabapentin, using five randomized controlled trials, was determined at two different doses to be ineffective at treating pain when compared to placebo. Other agents that were determined to be ineffective treatments for diabetic neuropathy were typical opioids (oxycodone), topical capsaicin 0.075%, dextromethorphan, and mexiletine.

Practice Pearls:
Pregabalin, oxcarbazepine, and tapentadol have shown to be effective vs placebo at relieving pain due to diabetic neuropathy and are also FDA approved for this indication.
Serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors may be a good choice for relief of diabetic neuropathy pain and have the additional benefit of relieving depression that is commonly associated with diabetic neuropathy
Additional studies are needed to assess long-term pain relief effectiveness.

References:
“Nerve Damage (Diabetic Neuropathies) | NIDDK.” National Institutes of Health. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Web 05 April 2017
Julie M. Waldfogel, Suzanne Amato Nesbit, Sydney M. Dy, Ritu Sharma, Allen Zhang, Lisa M. Wilson, Wendy L. Bennett, Hsin-Chieh Yeh, Yohalakshmi Chelladurai, Dorianne Feldman, Karen A. Robinson. “Pharmacotherapy for diabetic peripheral neuropathy pain and quality of life”. Neurology, 2017; 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003882 DOI: 10.1212/WNL.0000000000003882
 
Mark T. Lawrence, RPh, PharmD Candidate, University of Colorado-Denver, School of Pharmacy NTPD

 

 

 

Jovina cooks Italian: Carrot Cake

carrots-basket-vegetables-market-37641.jpeg
Italian Almond Carrot Cake (Torta di Carote)
This cake is gluten-free and made with olive oil. It is not your traditional American carrot cake.
You can also buy the carrots shredded from the supermarket.
Ingredients
Carrot cake
1/2 cup regular olive oil, not extra-virgin
1/4 cup pine nuts
3 cups shredded carrots
1/2 cup granulated sugar substitute
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
3 eggs
2 1/2 cups almond meal/flour
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 lemon, zest finely grated and juiced
Mascarpone cream
1 cup mascarpone
2 tablespoons rum
Directions
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line the base of a 9 inch springform pan with a parchment paper cut to fit the bottom. Coat with olive oil spray.

Add the pine nuts to a small dry pan and toast them over low heat.
Grate the carrots in a food processor or with a coarse grater, and put them on a double layer of paper towels. Wrap the towels around the carrots to soak up the excess liquid.
Using the whisk attachment in an electric mixer, combine the sweetener and olive oil until creamy.
Whisk in the vanilla and eggs. Fold in the almond meal/flour, nutmeg, grated carrots, toasted pine nuts the lemon zest and lemon juice.

Scrape the mixture into the prepared cake pan and smooth the surface with a rubber spatula. The batter will be not be very high in the pan.
Bake the cake until the top is risen and golden and a cake tester comes almost clean, about 45 to 50 minutes.
Remove the cake from the oven and let it rest on a rack for 10 minutes before removing the sides. Let cool until ready to serve. Transfer the cake to a serving platter.
Combine the mascarpone and rum in a small bowl. Slice the cake and serve with the mascarpone cream.

BMJ: Continuity and individualised care matter more to patients than guidelines

old woman walking

By Martin Rowland and Charlotte Paddison
Adapted from article in BMJ 18 May 2013
As the population rises more people are living with multiple medical conditions. These can be diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, macular degeneration, depression, cancer, coronary heart disease and dementia among others.

These cause complex health, emotional and social problems which make their management difficult, especially in socioeconomically deprived areas. A new model of care is needed to manage patients optimally in these circumstances.
Although this seems obvious, care seems to be moving in the wrong direction for these patients.
Evidence based guidelines are really geared to patients with single conditions. They don’t cater to someone who has multiple conditions. Over treatment, and overly complex surveillance and assessment routines result. Older, less well educated and less affluent patients cope particularly poorly with these regimes. Guidelines also fail to recognise that patients get more frail as they age. The burdens of illness and treatment are different for a 100 year old compared to a 50 year old.
An individualised regime for each patient needs to be developed to focus on what matters most to each one.
Unfortunately doctors often feel that they can’t deviate from a guideline for fear of criticism and litigation. Perhaps guidelines should only be applied when they are clearly being used in the patient’s best interests, instead of the doctor’s? Exception reporting is a mechanism that allows doctors to deviate from guidelines and maybe should be used more.
Medical training does not as yet focus on this sort of individualised care. Medicine of old age comes the closest.
Listening to patients is the key thing that can help a doctor understand what their needs and goals are. The most appropriate care can then be built around that. The biggest barrier to this seems to be the over emphasis on single conditions.  This prevents rather than enhances goal oriented care.
Longer consultations are needed to help guide patients talk about their needs and think through complex decisions.
Satisfaction and outcomes are improved if this can be achieved. Despite this patients still often complain that they never see the same doctor twice both in hospital and primary care. It is also particularly difficult to provide a good quality of care when a doctor does not  know the patient and does not see the patient for follow up.
Young adults say they want to see the same doctor 52% of the time, but this increases to over 80% in those aged over 75.  More than a quarter of patients however say they struggle to see the doctor of their choice. This seems to be getting worse over time rather than better. Perhaps this is due to nurses taking over a lot of the care regarding chronic illness. Doctors are also increasingly working part time and may be involved in other tasks other than direct patient care. Shift systems in hospitals limit continuity a great deal.
In primary care, advanced access schemes give faster access but at the expense of continuity of care.
Older patients are particularly keen on waiting a few days longer to see the GP of their choice. Booking systems need to allow for both access and continuity.
This can be improved by receptionists attempting to book patients with their “own” doctor rather than simply the first available. Two or three doctors can share lists and try to see each other’s patients if one is not available.  E-mail booking of doctors directly can help. E-mail consultations can help.  Time for these must be built into the working day. The number of doctors who deal with  particularly complex needs may need to be restricted. Monitoring continuity of care can help. What gets monitored tends to get done more often after all.
As guidelines need to become less important for patients with multi-morbidity, a doctor’s clinical judgement becomes more critical.  There can be squads of other health care professionals involved in a patient’s care and deciding what ones are necessary and what ones are not is a useful task.  As the need for the traditional UK General Practitioner is increasing, sadly, their availability and time commitments to patient care seem to be decreasing.

Kris Kresser: Why has the American approach to heart disease failed?

Why Has the American Approach to Heart Disease Failed?
on April 18, 2017 by Chris Kresser 

Tsimane 2

A recent New York Times article correctly suggests that diet and lifestyle changes are far more effective ways to prevent and treat heart disease than statins and stents. But what diet, and what lifestyle? Is it as simple as avoiding “artery-clogging saturated fat,” as the author suggests? Read on to find out why the American approach to heart disease has really failed.
Jane Brody wrote an article in The New York Times called “Learning from Our Parents’ Heart Health Mistakes.” She argues that despite decades of advice to change our diet and lifestyle in order to reduce our risk of heart disease, we still depend far too much on drugs and expensive procedures like stents.
She says:
Too often, the American approach to heart disease amounts to shutting the barn door after the horse has escaped.
To support this argument, she refers to a recent paper published on the Tsimane, an indigenous population in the Bolivian Amazon. The study found that the rate of coronary atherosclerosis in the Tsimane was one-fifth of that observed in the United States (and the lowest that has ever been measured). Nearly nine in 10 Tsimane had unobstructed coronary arteries and no evidence of heart disease, and the researchers estimated that the average 80-year-old Tsimane has the same vascular age as an American in his mid-50s.
I certainly agree with Ms. Brody so far, and her analogy that the American approach to heart disease amounts to shutting the barn door after the horse has escaped is spot on.
The problem is what comes next, as she attempts to answer the question of why the Tsimane have so much less heart disease than Americans:
Protein accounts for 14 percent of their calories and comes primarily from animal meats that, unlike American meats, are very low in artery-clogging saturated fat. [emphasis mine]
Does saturated fat “clog” your arteries?
Artery-clogging saturated fat? Are we still using that phrase in 2017?
As I’ve written before, on average, long-term studies do not show an association between saturated fat intake and blood cholesterol levels. (1) (I say “on average” because individual response to saturated fat can vary based on genetics and other factors—but this is a subject for another article.)
If you’re wondering whether saturated fat may contribute to heart disease in some way that isn’t related to cholesterol, a large meta-analysis of prospective studies involving close to 350,000 participants found no association between saturated fat and heart disease. (2)

Does saturated fat really “clog” your arteries?

Are “clogged arteries” the cause of heart disease?
Moreover, as Peter Attia eloquently and thoroughly described in this article, the notion that atherosclerosis is caused by “clogged arteries” was shown to be false many years ago:
Most people, doctors included, think atherosclerosis is a luminal-narrowing condition—a so-called “pipe narrowing” condition.  But by the time that happens, eleven other pathologic things have already happened and you’ve missed the opportunity for the most impactful intervention to prevent the cascade of events from occurring at all.
To reiterate: atherosclerosis development begins with plaque accumulation in the vessel wall, which is accompanied by expansion of the outer vessel wall without a change in the size of the lumen. Only in advanced disease, and after significant plaque accumulation, does the lumen narrow.
Michael Rothenberg also published an article on the fallacy of the “clogged pipe” hypothesis of heart disease. He said:
Although the image of coronary arteries as kitchen pipes clogged with fat is simple, familiar, and evocative, it is also wrong.
If heart disease isn’t caused by “clogged arteries,” what does cause it?
The answer to that question is a little more complex. For a condensed version, read my article “The Diet-Heart Myth: Why Everyone Should Know Their LDL Particle Number.”

For a deeper dive, read Dr. Attia’s article.
Here’s the 15-second version, courtesy of Dr. Attia:
Atherosclerosis is caused by an inflammatory response to sterols in artery walls. Sterol delivery is lipoprotein-mediated, and therefore much better predicted by the number of lipoprotein particles (LDL-P) than by the cholesterol they carry (LDL-C).
You might think that I’m splitting hairs here over terminology, but that’s not the case. It turns out that this distinction—viewing heart disease as caused by high LDL-P and inflammation, rather than arteries clogged by saturated fat—has crucial implications when it comes to the discussion of how to prevent it.
Because while it’s true that a high intake of saturated fat can elevate LDL particle number in some people, this appears to be a minority of the population. The most common cause of high LDL-P in Americans—and elsewhere in the industrial world—is almost certainly insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome. (I explain why in this article.)
And what is one of the most effective ways of treating insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome? That’s right: a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet!
News flash: diets high in saturated fat may actually prevent heart disease.
Perhaps this explains why low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets (yes, including saturated fat) have been shown to reduce the risk of heart disease.
For example, a meta-analysis of 17 low-carb diet trials covering 1,140 obese patients published in the journal Obesity Reviews found that low-carb diets were associated with significant decreases in body weight, as well as improvements in several CV risk factors, including decreases in triglycerides, fasting glucose, blood pressure, body mass index, abdominal circumference, plasma insulin, and C-reactive protein, as well as an increase in HDL cholesterol. (3)
(In case you’re wondering, low-carb diets in these studies had a null effect on LDL cholesterol: they neither increased nor decreased it.)
Saturated fat is a red herring.
Instead of focusing so much on saturated fat intake, which is almost certainly a red herring, why not focus on other aspects of the Tsimane’s diet and lifestyle that might contribute to their low risk of heart disease?

For example:
They are extremely active physically; Tsimane men walk an average of 17,000 steps a day, and Tsimane women walk an average of 15,000 steps a day—and they don’t sit for long periods. Ms. Brody does mention this in her article.
They don’t eat processed and refined foods. We have been far too focused on calories and macronutrient ratios and not enough on food quality. We now know that hunter–gatherers and pastoralists around the world have thrived on both high-carbohydrate, low-fat diets (like the Tsimane, who get 72 percent of calories from carbohydrate) and low-carbohydrate, high-fat diets (like the Masai and Inuit).

But what all hunter–gatherer diets share in common is their complete absence of processed and refined foods.
Perhaps if we stopped focusing so much on the amount of fat and carbohydrate in our diet and started focusing more on the quality of the food we eat, we’d be better off.
And of course we also need to attend to the many other differences between our modern lifestyle (which causes heart disease) and the ancestral lifestyle (which prevents it), including physical activity, sleep, stress, light exposure, play/fun, and social support.
The Tsimane study illustrates exactly why an evolutionary perspective on diet, lifestyle, and behavior is so important. It helps us to generate hypotheses on what aspects of our modern way of life may be contributing to chronic diseases like atherosclerosis and gives us ideas about what interventions we need to make to prevent and reverse these diseases.

Ann : Cloud Bread

This is a recipe contributed by one of our readers Ann 

eggs

Ingredients

 

3 eggs separated

 

55g Philadelphia  light cheese

 

¼ teaspoon cream of tartar

 

Method

 

Whip egg whites with cream of tartar

 

Mix egg yolk and cheese so there are  no lumps 

 

Fold in the egg whites to the mixture

 

Arrange

 

 on a greased baking tray in biscuit formation.

 

180 or 160 fan 20-30 min.