Natural low carb store: Chocolate cake

 

Ingredients

9 Eggs (medium)
300g Dark Chocolate (minimum 72% cocoa)
150g Inulin Powder
70g Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
30ml Double Cream
1 tsp Vanilla Extract

Method

(makes approx. 18 servings)

Pre-heat the oven to 140°C. Melt the chocolate in a heat proof bowl over hot water (bain-marie) then stir through the double cream. Whilst the chocolate is melting separate the egg yolks and egg whites into two bowls. Whip the whites to form soft peaks. Combine the egg yolks with the inulin very gently (do not mix). Add the melted chocolate mixture to the egg yolks then sift in the cocoa powder and add the vanilla and combine together. Fold in the egg whites. Pour into a large round spring form cake tin (buttered if non-stick or lined if not) and place in the oven for 40 minutes. Remove and allow to cool so the cake comes away from the sides of the tin slightly. Serve with berries and a dollop of cream!

Treating hypos post sugar tax

Lucozade just isn’t what it used to be. With the sugar tax affecting the diabetics favourite emergency beverage the Independent Diabetes Trust have compiled a list of substitutes that you may wish to use.

For shear portability and cuteness Emma and I are great fans of Jelly Babies but you may have your own.

 

5-7 Dextrosol

4-5 Glucotabs

60 mls Glucojuice (one bottle)

150-200mls pure fruit juice

3-4 heaped teaspoons of sugar dissolved in water

4-5 Jelly Babies

Retirees are happier when they are active

An Australian study has shown that getting a good sleep at night and being active during the day was the most effective way to boost mood in retirees.

105 people took part in the Life After Work study. They were followed for six month before retirement to 12 months afterwards. They carefully logged their activities and their mood was measured.

The time spent on chores, physical activity, quiet time, screen time, self care, sleep, transport and work, all changed over this period of time. The most favourable substitution was replacing work time with physical activity and sleep.  Replacing work with screen time and social activity showed less effect on mood enhancement.

After retirement, depression, anxiety and stress all reduced.

Olds T et al One day you will wake up and won’t have to go to work: The impact of changes in time use on mental health following retirement. PLoS ONE.2018;13(6);e0199605.doi:101371/journal.pone.0199605. PMID:29953472

RCGP: What doctors need to know about types one and two diabetes in young people

The Royal College of General Practitioners have recently released an educational programme for UK doctors which they have very kindly allowed me to link to our website.

I recorded this over a year ago and I think the college held off production until their type two diabetes low carb course was also released for doctors.

This means that the RCGP joins the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists as supporters of low carbing  for both type one and two diabetes.  Surely the other clinical associations and Royal Colleges will follow in due course?

The screencast includes information on diagnosis, emergency situations, blood sugar and dietary management and contraception.

“I have also separately produced an educational screencast on Diabetes in adults (type 1), children and young people (type 1&2) for the Royal College of General Practitioners in my role as an RCGP Clinical Adviser”

http://elearning.rcgp.org.uk/mod/page/view.php?id=8368

 

What factors are most predictive of a heart attack?

Dr Malcolm Kendrick recently discussed a paper in which computers analysed routine clinical data from UK GP practices to identify the factors that most accurately predicted a cardiovascular event over the next ten years.  All the 378,256  people whose records were analysed were initially free of cardiovascular disease and 48 variables were identified.

The top ten things that were most likely to see you in hospital with a heart attack or stroke, in order,  were:

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

Prescribed oral steroids

Older age

Severe mental illness

South Asian ethnicity

Prescribed immunosuppressants

Socio-economic deprivation

Chronic Kidney Disease

 

The least predictive were LDL, Forced expiratory volume ( a measure of asthma) and AST/ALT ( a measure of liver function).  Total cholesterol was 25th.

Can machine learning improve cardiovascular risk prediction using routine clinical data? http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0174944

Most of the public are blissfully unaware of serious diabetes complications

A survey by Walnut Unlimited asked 1,000 UK people, what can the effects of having diabetes be?

None of them were aware of the pregnancy related consequences of diabetes.

2% knew about stroke, 4% about kidney damage, and 6% about heart disease.  Similarly low numbers knew that diabetes is related to a shorter life span.  A quarter of those surveyed however did know that amputation and sight loss were complications of diabetes.

Diabetes affects more individuals in the UK than any other serious health condition such as dementia or cancer. 3.7 million people in the UK have diabetes. There are 8,700 diabetes related amputations and 1,600 cases of visual impairment every year.

Diabetic complications can be minimised or avoided by early diagnosis, education and support.

Cooking without limits: Refreshing lemonade

Ingredients:
3 lemon juices
1 liter water
A bunch of fresh mint leaves
½ tea spoon Stevia or sugar substitute to taste
Directions:
Mix everything together. If you don’t have ice put the jar in the fridge. Enjoy!

My friend Marion says don’t plant mint in your garden. It is so easy to grow it will take over everything.  Plant it in a pot and keep it on your patio.