Dr Mark Cucuzella: Online resources for low carbing for patients and doctors

Adapting Medication for Type 2 Diabetes to a Low Carbohydrate Diet- Frontiers 2021

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnut.2021.688540/full

The above link gives the full paper from Dr Cucuzella about the medication adaptations, including insulin adaptations that need to be done if you are transitioning to a low carb diet. There is a helpful traffic light summary. Some medications do not need altered and these are discussed too.

Diet Doctor video on article “Why deprescription should be your new favorite word”

What your new diet will consist of and how to avoid unnecessary expense or complicated recipes is fully discussed in the following links. They are the same booklet but in different formats.

Our new “Low Carb on any Budget  – A Low-carb Shopping and Recipe Starter Begin a Life Free of Dieting and Indulge Yourself in Health” patient guide- Print and share with your patients

Pdf version

www.tinyurl.com/lowcarbanybudget

online flipbook

www.tinyurl.com/lowcarbanybudgetebook

For clinicians through guideline central

These booklets are quite complex and are for doctors who want to know more about low carb diets and fine tuning of medication and insulin. The first is in USA units and the second is the UK format. It does no harm for any diabetic or their carers to read these too but bear in mind that they do go into some depth.

-Guideline Central: Low-Carbohydrate Nutrition Approaches in Patients with Obesity, Prediabetes and  Type 2 Diabetes

http://eguideline.guidelinecentral.com/i/1180534-low-carb-nutritional-approaches-guidelines-advisory/0?

UK version – http://eguideline.guidelinecentral.com/i/1183584-low-carb-nutrition-queens-units/0? 

If you can avoid competitive eating as a child you will be thinner

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio on Pexels.com

Adapted from Independent Diabetes Trust Newsletter Dec 2021 and BMJ 29 Jan 2022

In the journal of Clinical Obesity researchers have shown that people who eat faster tend to gain more weight and are at higher risk of obesity than slow eaters. This is because it takes at least 20 minutes for stomach hormones to tell your brain that your hunger is satisfied.

They also found that only children didn’t tend to eat as fast as children who had siblings. The fast eating habit tends to persist in to adulthood and thus weight gain compared to only children.

My comments: I was one of four children and we certainly ate fast. If you didn’t grab the food quick enough it disappeared! This stood me in good stead as a doctor when there was very little time for eating on the job. My husband was one of three and is great at competitive eating too! He said it helped when working off shore when meals were slotted in during less busy periods. I had forgotten most of the childhood meal behaviours till I went to one of my friends houses with her husband and noticed that he carefully guarded his plate with his arm. I recalled that this was common practice in our house but that I had stopped doing it since leaving home. He was one of four children again. He had simply never changed his eating posture since leaving home!

In the American College of Cardiology 2021 they report that teenagers who have high BMIs have a 9% greater risk of getting type 2 diabetes, and an 0.8% greater risk of having a heart attack in their 30s and 40s than normal weight teens. Regardless of their adult BMI, teens who were heavier went on to have a 2.6% greater risk of having poorer overall health in adulthood.

Tim Noakes: Nutrition Network Courses for Health Professionals

Homepage | Nutrition Network (nutrition-network.org)

Tim Noakes shot to fame in the low carb community by being accused of malpractice by two South African dieticians for giving dietary advice when he was not a registered dietician. After five long miserable years and the support of international colleagues he won the case. Anna Dahlquist, a Swedish GP had gone through the same thing a few years before this, and not only won her case, but managed to get the Swedish food guidelines for people with diabetes changed.

Professor Noakes has established online training for health professionals covering a variety of useful topics. Participants can be from all over the world and will receive accreditation. The full list of topics can be found by clicking on the homepage in BOLD above.

Public health collaboration online conference 2021

Sam Feltham has done it again. This year’s conference is now available on you tube right now.

Last weekend there were many contributors from diverse fields including members of the public, doctors, academics, and the scientific journalist Gary Taubes who gave the opening talk about ketogenic diets.

The courses that particularly interested me were about the experiences of type one diabetics who had adopted the low carb approach, how to achieve change, and how to increase your happiness.

There are talks about eating addiction and eating disorders, statins, and vegetable oil consumption.

Much of the material will be familiar to readers of this blog. There are some new speakers and topics which do indicate that a grassroots movement in changing our dietary guidelines is gaining ground.

Dietary gluten in pregnancy is related to an increased risk of type one diabetes in the child

Adapted from Antvorskov JC et al. Association between maternal gluten intake and type one diabetes in offspring. BMJ 22 September 2018

This research was based on a study of Danish women’s food frequency questionnaires completed 25 weeks after their first pregnancies ended. The incidence of diabetes in the children was then noted from January 1996 till May 2016 from the Danish Registry of Childhood and Adolescent Diabetes. After certain exclusions had been made over 63,500 were analysed.

The mean gluten intake per day was 13g ranging from 7g to more than 20g per day.

The incidence of diabetes in the child increased proportionately according to gluten intake. The women who had  20g or more intake had double the type one diabetes in their offspring compared to those who ate 7g or less.

As type one diabetes has risen seemingly inexplicably over the last few decades, there has been a lot of consideration into possible environmental triggers. Gluten is a storage protein found in wheat, rye and barley.  In animal studies, a wheat free diet in the mother has been found to dramatically reduce the incidence of diabetes in the child.

It has been suggested that gluten can affect gut permeability, gut microbiotica and cause low grade inflammation.

Although there is this association between gluten and type one diabetes it could be that other factors, for example the advanced glycation products from the baking process, that are to blame.  Unwanted additives to grain  could also be a factor eg mycotoxins, heavy metals, pesticides and fertilisers.

Mothers who eat a lot of gluten may similarly feed their children a lot of gluten. They also may pass gliadin from wheat into the breast milk.

Although this research suggests that high amounts of gluten may be problematic in pregnancy, further research will need to be done before dietary recommendations are likely to be changed.

Should you get tested for coeliac?

From Allergy and Autoimmune Disease for Healthcare Professionals October 9 2019

Apparently 70% of people who have coeliac have yet to be tested for it.

Who may have it?

4.7% of those with irritable bowel syndrome.

20% of those with mouth ulcers.

8% of infertile couples.

16% of type one diabetics.

7.5% of first degree relatives of people with coeliac.

About 50% of people who are diagnosed have iron deficiency diagnosis  at the time of coeliac diagnosis.

Other people who need to be tested may have:

Pancreatic insufficiency

Early onset osteoporosis or osteopenia

vitamin and mineral deficiencies

gall bladder malfunction

secondary lactose intolerance

peripheral and central nervous system disorders

Turner’s syndrome

Down’s syndrome

Dental enamel defects

persistent raised liver enzymes of unknown cause

peripheral neuropathy or ataxia

metabolic bone disorders

autoimmune thyroid disease

unexplained iron, vitamin D or folate deficiency

unexpected weight loss

prolonged fatigue

faltering growth

second degree relative with coeliac disease

My comment: I had years of  the mouth ulcers, iron deficiency anaemia and irritable bowel symptoms which all resolved completely on a wheat free diet. The problem is that if I did want tested I would need to go back on wheat for a minimum of six weeks to give my antibodies a chance to build up sufficiently to test positive.  Thus, best to get a test BEFORE you go on a wheat free diet.

 

 

Diet doctor: free online course with credit for medical professionals

This is a message from dietician Adele Hite:

I am thrilled to announce that Diet Doctor is now offering a free CME activity to all interested clinicians, patients and carers: Treating metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and obesity with therapeutic carbohydrate restriction.

Thanks to the support of our members, we can offer this CME at no cost to clinicians.

This fully referenced, evidence-based CME activity is certified for three AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. It is jointly provided by Postgraduate Institute for Medicine (PIM) and Diet Doctor and is intended for physicians, physician assistants, registered nurses, and dietitians engaged in the care of patients with metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes, and obesity.

The course was designed by clinicians for clinicians. As this course outline shows, it covers all clinicians need to know about dietary carbohydrate restriction and how to implement it safely and effectively with patients for whom it is appropriate. In keeping with Diet Doctor’s mission to “make low carb simple,” the course also comes with supplemental materials for clinicians and their patients to make it easy to translate evidence into practice.

We hope that this course will help reaffirm the scientific and clinical support for this approach and — along with other efforts by LowCarbUSA and expert clinicians — act as another step in solidifying a standard of care around low-carb nutrition. We would love it if you would share the news about this course with colleagues. You can forward this email to them or use this flyer to share or post.

Diet Doctor also has some new resources to help make low carb simple for patients and clinicians alike. For patients, we have:
‒ a sample menu
‒ shopping list
‒ a meal planning guide
‒ a substitutes for favorite foods handout
‒ simple meals and planned leftovers, and
‒ information about target protein ranges

For clinicians, we have handy one-pagers on:
‒ monitoring ketones
‒ fasting insulin and HOMA-IR ranges
‒ lab tests and follow-up schedule
‒ type 2 diabetes medication reduction, and
‒ a 5-day food diary for patients who need to monitor their intake

Of course, for those on the list who are not clinicians, anyone can register for and view the course. You just won’t be eligible for CME credits.

For clinicians, please let us know if we can help you help your patients in other ways. And if you are interested in supporting us as we continue to develop materials to make low carb easy for clinicians and patients, please think about becoming a Diet Doctor member yourself.

Finally, we are happy to hear suggestions for improvements moving forward. If you take the time to view the course, we’d love to hear what you think.

Best regards,
Adele

Nina’s plea: Would you write to Congress and change USA food guidelines?

This is a message from Nina Teicholz, writer and low carb activist:

My highest concern about the existing USA Food Guidelines is for the people who have no choice but to eat the food that they are given, which is based on what is thought of as “a healthy diet”. There are many essentially ‘captive’ populations in schools, hospitals, and prisons. Many of these people are the most disadvantaged among us. Native Americans on reservations have no choice about the food assistance they receive.

I’ve spoken with the Native American woman who for years has been trying to change the USDA food they get, and she cannot get even the tiniest change. They desperately need the food, yet it’s more than 50% carbs, and something like 40% of the kids on these reservations have diabetes.

The same is true for poor people, education programs, and feeding programs for the elderly. These people have no choice.  No other food  is given to them. Many doctors also say they have no choice, because  they are required to teach the guidelines to patients. It is the same thing in most federally funded institutions.

Thus, my hope is, if we have to have Guidelines for the time being, that they do as little harm as possible. The Guideline is coming up for review, but the committee have already decided not to review the evidence on low carb diet studies.  We are seeking to change this, and there is already some support for our position, that these studies should be included in the evaluation. Could we get in a low-carb option? Could we force them to consider all the science on saturated fats? This next set of Guidelines will come out by the end of this year, and I think there is still time to try to force change. Our actions now would build awareness around the issue that there is something wrong with the Guidelines. There is so little awareness of the problems. And actually I’m hopeful,  because in the last few months, we’ve worked with a number of groups to raise awareness to a level it’s never been before.

Here’s what I would suggest for now.
Both my group, The Nutrition Coalition and the group Low-carb Action Network,  have webpages that make it very easy for you (if American) to write/call your Members of Congress. This is super important and I urge everyone to do this. USDA is not budging. Congress is really the only body of power interested in change, and they need to hear from people. So I would urge everyone to contact their members of Congress. It can take just a few min.

Thank you,

Nina

My comment: If the USDA food guidelines are changed, it would make it so much easier for the UK to follow. The photograph shows the breakfast given to a diabetic patient in a US hospital who had just had a heart attack. The UK also dishes out abysmal food to its patients. Wouldn’t it be great if they had a low carb option?

Public Health Collaboration conference online a great success

The Public Health collaboration online conference 2020  was very successful.  The videos are available on You Tube for free making the conference even more accessible for everyone who needs advice on what to eat to stay healthy.

If you are able to contribute to the PHC fund to keep up our good work please do so. Sam Feltham has suggested £2.00.  This is via the PHC site.

This year there were contributions from mainly the UK but also the USA.

Visitors to this site will be very pleased to know that keeping your weight in the normal range, keeping your blood sugars tightly controlled, keeping your vitamin D levels up, and keeping fit from activity and exercise, are all important factors in having a good result if you are unfortunate enough to be affected by Covid-19. We have been promoting these factors in our book and website for several years now, mainly with the view to making life more enjoyable, especially for people with diabetes, now and in the future. The reduction in the severity  to the effects of   coronavirus is a side effect of these healthy living practices.

Several talks went into the factors and reasons for this, but in a nutshell, if you are in a pro-inflammatory state already, you will have a much more pronounced cytokine inflammatory response to the virus than is useful for clearing the virus, and you end up with inflammed lung tissue which leaks fluid thereby impairing your blood oxygen levels.

A talk that I found particularly apt was the talk from a GP who had had a heart attack at the age of 44 despite a lack of risk factors except for massive stress. He gives a list of self care practices that helped him. I would also include playing with your animals. Emma and I are cat lovers and can vouch for this!

My talk is about VR Fitness, which was the only talk this year which was specifically exercise related. The Oculus Quest has only been out a year and has been sold out since shortly after New Year. I was fortunate enough to buy one in anticipation of my imminent retirement, and it has been great as an exercise tool over the long, cold, dark winter and more useful than I had ever anticipated over the lockdown as a social tool.

There were several very professional cooking and baking demonstrations on the conference this year, and indeed, this could not have otherwise happened on a traditional stage format.  We had low carb “rice”, bread, pancakes and pizza demonstrations which may well help you if you prefer to see how it is done step by step or if you want to broaden your repertoire.

I was particularly taken with the pizza base idea from Emma Porter and I will follow up with this in a later post.  The whole video is available from the PHC  site which takes you to all the videos on You Tube.

 

 

 

Belinda Fettke: The origins of the food companies behind the grain based diet

This is part one of a three part series on how we have ended up with a cardiovascular disease epidemic, what treatments we are using which don’t work, and what treatments do work.

The in first episode Belinda Fettke discusses the history behind the 7th Day Adventists who genuinely believed that they were bringing health to the USA population by promoting a grain based diet.

This is a long video but entertaining as well as informative.