Hypo Awareness Week

the hypo awareness logo on the Diabetes DietIt’s Hypo Awareness Week—what’s your favourite symptom?!

Kidding. Apart from a brief spell of time as a food-obsessed teenager when a hypo gave me the legit excuse to eat half a packet of Lucozade tablets, most of us hate the hypo.

From people who’ve found themselves in supermarkets eating handfuls of cereal from boxes (one of our lovely readers), to those nasty little spells where your mind goes blank and gives you a taste of what dementia might be like, most of us would banish hypos from our lives if we could.

The symptoms include:

  • hunger—your stomach might growl
  • turning pale and sweaty
  • tingling lips
  • shakes or trembling
  • dizziness
  • feeling tired
  • a fast or pounding heartbeat (palpitations)
  • becoming irritated, tearful, stroppy or moody
  • seeing floaters (a little blob of bright colour that moves) when you close your eyes or experiencing blurred vision

Most diabetics I’ve spoken to will add in another symptom—we don’t like others telling us we’re hypo. It’s to do with hypos making us irritable, and also because many of us strive to lead independent lives. Someone else noticing you’re unwell before you do undermines that ambition. Please bear with us and try not to mind our irritation.

We can’t moan about the symptoms too much, though. Still getting them after decades of diabetes is A. Good. Thing. If you lose the signs that your blood sugar levels have dipped too low, you risk passing out or having a seizure, and ultimately an untreated low blood glucose level can kill.

There are plenty of causes, such as

  • when you skip or miss a meal
  • if you take too much insulin to cover a meal
  • your basal rate being too high
  • exercise
  • unplanned activity
  • alcohol
  • changes to your routine

And because diabetes is a b***h to women, your cycle interferes with diabetes control too. Most women experience insulin resistance in the week or so leading up to their period and thus will need to take extra insulin to cover it. But the day the insulin resistance eases off can vary—it might be the day you get your period, it could be a few days later and BANG, higher than normal insulin doses, hypos left, right and centre…

 

Want to add any of your unusual symptoms or any scenarios you have found yourself in, thanks to a hypo? We love your comments…